SCHOOL SPORT CANADA• SPORT SCOLAIRE CANADA

Coaches of the Month

November 24, 2010 by  
Filed under Canadian Sport Features, Coach of the Month

Every month the SSC recognizes some of the dedicated coaches that make school sport possible for all Canadian high school students.

November

David Hocking

david-hocking-coach

David Hocking

David Hocking is a father of 2 who dedicates the majority of his time to coaching four youth football teams and a charity he started recently with his wife.

David is the coach of two London Minor Football Association teams, the London Jr. Mustangs and runs the football program at John Paul II Catholic Secondary School in his spare time.

However, he is more than a football coach to his players. He teaches them good values to live by as well.  He encourages helping out others in need and giving back to the community. Throughout the years, he has had his teams clean up local neighborhoods and collect items for a local women’s shelter.

Cleats for Kids is the charity he founded with his wife, Jeanie, that collects sporting gear for low-income families who are not in the financial position to buy equipment of their own. This charity allows less fortunate children the opportunity to be part of organized sports, which will ultimately help develop their teamwork and leadership skills.

David recognizes the importance of organized sports for a child as he was from a low-income family during his childhood as well. His football coach growing up was like a father figure to him, and he hopes to mirror that sentiment with kids he coaches today.

David’s dedication to his players on and off the field has won him the NFL Youth Coach of the Year award. The prize for the award was $5000 dollars worth of sports equipment that he certainly put to good use considering the mandate of his charity, Cleats for Kids.

The parents of players on David’s teams are grateful for his enthusiasm and commitment to influencing their children’s lives for the better. One of the parents, Angela Phillips, who nominated David for the NFL award states “It is one thing to coach but it is another to be a wonderful role model and mentor for so many children and people. Dave spends so much time coaching yet he and his wife also started a charity to provide cleats for kids that can’t afford new ones. . . . His selfless acts inspire others to do more.”

David is more than deserving of this award and will continue to be a great influence in many of his players’ lives. Congratulations David!

January

Kristen Asmundson, River East Collegiate

Kristen Asmundson

Kristen Asmundson

Kristen is the January “Harv-AL Urban Coach of the Month”.

Her Kodiaks Varsity Girls Basketball team is currently ranked #2 in province.

She has been coaching at River East for 8 years, and has attained 6 KPAC championships, 8 MHSAA appearances, and one final four appearance.

Kristen is a former Bison athlete and also coaches Field Hockey.

Keith Braaksma, Glenboro Collegiate

Keith Braaksma

Keith Braaksma

Keith Braaksma has been selected MHSAA January “Harv-Al Rural Coach of the Month”.  Keith has been involved with the volleyball program at Glenboro School for several years, both as an assistant and head coach.   This year as a head coach, along with the team, he was able to win the Provincial “A” Boys’ Volleyball title.

As an out of school coach, Keith has done an amazing job with his players.  All players respond very positively to Keith as they have a high level of respect with his approach and demeanor in the program.  Keith has a wonderful sense of humour with his players, but at the same time he is able to still relay the seriousness of commitment and effort as team. Certainly a great asset to the Glenboro School athletic program!

December

Jeff Maxwell, Elton Collegiate

Jeff Maxwell

Jeff Maxwell

Jeff Maxwell, of Elton Collegiate in Forrest, Manitoba has been selected as the HARV-AL SPORTS Rural Coach of the Month for December.

Jeff has been coaching volleyball for over a decade at Elton Collegiate. With the boys program, he has won two AA provincial championships and been a provincial finalist three times. Jeff took over the girls program three years ago, and has won the last two AA provincials. This past December, he also hosted the Provincials.

Jeff has also been a constant presence at Elton Track and Field for the last decade. He has coached numerous athletes to provincial medals over the years. This year Jeff is also running the Varsity girls’ basketball program.

Carey Lasuik, Daniel McIntyre

Carey Lasuik of the Daniel McIntyre Maroons Basketball team  has been selected as the HARV- AL SPORTS Urban Coach of the Month for December.

Carey has been an integral part of the Daniel McIntyre Basketball program for the past 16 years; He has helped to develop this year’s team into one of the top in the province.   His team is probably the smallest “AAAA” team in Winnipeg, but probably hustles the most.

Carey’s coaching has developed a continued attitude of hard work, determination, and integrity among all of the players this year and every year in the past. His Maroon team captured the Provincial “AAAA” title in 2001, and his teams also won “A” titles when he coached the Gray Academy team.

November

Alison McGillivray, Little Flower Acadamy

Alison McGillivray

About Alison McGillivray:
Alison McGillivray is a teacher coach at Little Flower Academy in Vancouver. She started the school’s field hockey program in 1985 and has been the coach ever since. She has also coached basketball, cross country and tennis.

Why She Became a Coach:
“I always enjoyed being on a sports team and coaching seemed a good way to give back. I think it’s important to contribute to life in the school outside of the classroom and coaching is a good way to do this.”

Most Rewarding Experience as a Coach:
“Lots of rewarding experiences. They include seeing players improve, have fun with their team mates, learn the value of commitment and sportsmanship. Working with the other hockey coaches at our school. The appreciation I have for so many parents who help the program at our school.”

What Coaching has Brought to Her Life:
“A lot of new people – either coaches, umpires, players or parents.”

What Athletes Look for in a Good Coach:
“Consistency and fairness.”

Biggest Challenges:
“Finding enough time – coaching a sport is like teaching another course. Life is extremely hectic during the season, but it is always worth the extra work.

Proudest Moment in Coaching:
“I had one today. LFA is a AA school and has four field hockey teams (largest sport in the school). Today, as I was taking my team to a game, there were two other squads heading out and the fourth one was practicing. So thankful to all the other coaches who are the program and make LFA such a hockey school

Ken Buchan, Holy Cross High School Coach

Ken Buchan

About Ken Buchan:
Ken Buchan currently teaches at Holy Cross High School in Surrey. He’s been coaching for 20 years, in a variety of sports and at a number of different levels. He’s currently the senior football coach at Holy Cross School.

Why He Became a Coach:
“I enjoy football and wanted to give back to the sport that has done so much for me.”

Most Rewarding Experience as a Coach:
“Whenever one of our past players comes back to help out with our program. Also, whenever one of our players goes on to play in university.”

What He Does in His Spare Time:
“I watch my son and daughter play their sports and play Xbox 360!”

What Coaching has Brought to His Life:
“The chance to meet and coach some great kids. The friendships you develop with players and coaches after they’ve left your program.”

What Athletes Look for in a Good Coach:
“Someone who knows the game, is respectful; and a person that players can talk to.”

Biggest Challenge:
“The small number of students we get out to play football each year. We need to talk to kids in the school and on the team, and try and promote the sport in the school.

Proudest Moment in Coaching:
“Winning the 2007 AAA senior football championship.”

October

Richard Fast, Oak Bay Secondary

Richard Fast

About Richard Fast:
Richard Fast is the PE department head at Oak Bay Secondary in Victoria, where he’s taught since 1999. He coaches senior boys soccer and grade 9 boys basketball. He also coaches a community men’s soccer team in the evenings.

Why He Became a Coach:
“The people who influenced my life and the people I connected with as a student-athlete were the coaches. Coaching is a way for me to give back and help a kid develop as an athlete and a person.”

Most Rewarding Experience as a Coach:
“Seeing kids improve. Seeing them buy into the concepts you’re trying to teach, and being a good citizen in the school and on the school field. They buy into the fact that they’re representing their school and the school spirit they develop is the ultimate reward.”

What Coaching has Brought to His Life:
“Fulfillment. Excitement in terms of coming to school. Developing relationships with kids on a deeper level than in the classroom.”

What Athletes Look for in a Good Coach:
“I think they look for someone who’s going to be honest. I don’t believe you have to coddle athletes. I think they like to be pushed and challenged. I think they also like to feel connected to the team and the coach.”

Biggest Challenges:
“I’m married with a 4 year old and 2 year old. The biggest challenge is balancing my family life and professional life. I certainly have a lot of respect for coaches. I didn’t realize how much of a sacrifice they made.”

Proudest Moment in Coaching:
“One of the proudest moments was when my Ucluelet “A” boys basketball team won the island championships in 97-98. They came from nowhere and put themselves on the map. That was my first deep connection to a team.”

Leanne Collyer, Maple Ridge Secondary

 

Leanne Collyer

About Leanne Collyer:
Leanne Collyer has been coaching for 8 years. She began her coaching career in grade 12 when she was an assistant coach on an elementary school basketballl team. She’s currently the PE department head at Maple Ridge Secondary, and coaches grade 8 girls volleyball, junior girls volleyball, junior girls basketball and mountain biking.

Why She Became a Coach:
“I had such a great experience during my high school and university sports career that I wanted to be able to give that experience to other students. Coaching keeps me connected to the students in the school and the school itself.”

Most Rewarding Experience as a Coach:
“Taking the junior girls team to a tournament in Kamloops. We surprised a lot of people with a strong team.”

What Coaching has Brought to Her Life:
“Many laughs, and making tough decisions.”

What Athletes Look for in a Good Coach:
“Someone they can look up to, has knowledge of the sport, treats people with respect, and is constantly challenging them.”

Biggest Challenges:
“Biggest challenges are balancing home life with school life. There never seems to be enough time in the day to do everything you need to.”

Proudest Moment in Coaching:
“Ending the seasons and being so proud of the athletes.”

September

Helen Posthumus, Tamanawis Secondary

Helen Posthumus

About Helen Posthumus:
Helen Posthumus currently teaches LST, ESL and English at Tamanawis Secondary in Surrey. She previously taught at Holy Cross School and has coached cross country, volleyball and basketball. She considers track and field to be her main sport.

Why She Became a Coach:
“Because of the experiences I had playing sports in high school. I had great coaches and a lot of success, and I wanted to share that with my own students.”

Most Rewarding Experience as a Coach:
“When I left Holy Cross we had won the Surrey track and field championships three years in a row. We had 100 kids on the track team, out of 700 kids in the school. I worked hard to increase participation, and track became a mainstream sport for our school.”

The Importance of Staying Active:
“I feel strongly that having kids involved in track gives them a greater chance of having an active lifestyle. And track is something that’s accessible after high school – everyone can run.”

What Athletes Look for in a Good Coach:
“I would say someone who sets high goals and challenges them. Someone to offer encouragement and support. And obviously being dedicated to what they do.”

Biggest Challenges:
“Balancing priorities: family versus coaching. I get a lot of support from family. Today kids are specializing in many sports. It’s challenging having kids commit – they have to balance their priorities as well.”

Proudest Moment in Coaching:
“Having 100 kids on the track team at Holy Cross. It was hard to leave and I remember telling the team and there were lots of tears. You see how much the kids want you there. Establishing the program to that level was my proudest moment.”

Aaron McKimmon, Maple Ridge Sec.

 

Aaron Mckimmon

About Aaron McKimmon:
Aaron currently teaches at Maple Ridge Secondary and coaches Grade 8 and Senior Girls Volleyball. He’s been coaching for 14 years, including 2 years in Japan.

His First Coaching Experience:
Aaron started coaching when he was a student-athlete himself in Grade 11 at Hatzic Secondary. He coached the grade 8 girls volleyball team. His motto, truly – Just Do it!

Most Rewarding Experience as a Coach:
“The enhanced relationship with kids in the classroom. Once you coach them it’s like that experience becomes an extension of the classroom…they look up to you, look for guidance, and they’re not afraid to ask questions or for your opinion.”

What He Does in His Spare Time:
Aaron recently had a new baby, a son named Yoshi…and has been spending lots of time playing with him. He continues to play recreational volleyball in an adult league where from time to time he sees former students who are also still playing.

What Does an Athlete Look For in a Good Coach:
“Knowledge of the game, ability to translate that knowledge into skill development, motivators, confidence and the ability to keep the sport fun.”

Biggest Challenges:
“Conflicts for gym time, desire to play other sports, athletes have to choose especially if they are a multi-sport athlete.”

Proudest Moment in Coaching:
“Taking this years senior girls team to the Fraser Valleys. Our school has never advanced that far.”

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